The Lakes Open, Australian Golf Tournament

The Lakes Open was an Australian men's professional golf tournament played from the mid-1930s through the mid-1970s, although with several gaps including due to World War II. It was named after its location: The tournament was always played at The Lakes Golf Club in Sydney.

First played: 1934

Last played: 1974

The Lakes Open was founded in 1934 as a secondary event to an Australia vs. United States (Ryder Cup-style) team tournament. Every winner was Australian except the first, American Craig Wood; and 1952 champ Jimmy Adams, a Scotsman.

It was won four times by amateurs, first by Jim Ferrier in 1936-37. Ferrier had been runner-up in 1935, and going for the threepeat in 1938 was runner-up again. Ferrier did win a third time in 1948.

Another three-time winner was Kel Nagle, who took the title in 1954 and 1957-58, and was also runner-up in 1950, 1952 and 1959. Eric Cremin and Frank Phillips were the other three-time winners.

The Lakes Tournament had some wild swings in scores. Jimmy Adams won in 1952 at 19-over, Nagle two years later at 6-under, then amateur Harry Berwick in 1956 at 17-over. Norman Von Nida set the tournament scoring record of 277 in 1938. The largest margin of victory was nine by Ferrier in 1936.

Also known as: In its final year, 1974, the tournament was named the Coca-Cola Lakes Open.

Winners of The Lakes Open

1934 — Craig Wood, 283
1935 — Fred Bolger, 284
1936 — a-Jim Ferrier, 281
1937 — a-Jim Ferrier, 297
1938 — Norman Von Nida, 277
1939 — Norman Von Nida, 292 (def. Billy Bolger in playoff)
1940–1946 — Not played
1947 — Ossie Pickworth, 291
1948 — Jim Ferrier, 283
1949 — Eric Cremin, 287
1950 — Eric Cremin, 293
1951 — Ted Naismith, 296
1952 — Jimmy Adams, 307
1953 — Eric Cremin, 296
1954 — Kel Nagle, 282
1955 — Les Wilson, 296
1956 — a-Harry Berwick, 305
1957 — Kel Nagle, 289
1958 — Kel Nagle, 290
1959 — Frank Phillips, 290
1960 — Frank Phillips, 291
1961 — a-Phil Billings, 280
1962 — Les Wilson, 282
1963 — Peter Thomson, 288
1964 — Ted Ball, 279
1965 — Not played
1966 — Frank Phillips, 280
1967 — Bruce Devlin, 287
1968–1973 — Not played
1974 — Bob Shearer, 297 (def. Ted Ball, Paul Murray in playoff)

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