How to Play the Golf Game Called Acey Ducey (or Aces and Deuces)

The golf betting game called Acey Ducey, or Aces and Deuces, is for groups of four golfers. On each hole, the low score (the "ace") wins an agreed upon amount from the other three players, and the high score (the "duece") loses an agreed upon amount to the other three players.

First things first: Your group members need to agree on the value of the bets, both the ace bet and the deuce bet. You can set these values at anything you want — any value your group can afford to wager — but, typically in Acey Ducey, the ace bet is worth twice the deuce bet.

As we'll see in the following example, Acey Ducey bets can add up in a hurry, either through setting the bets too high, or by one golfer dominating the game. So be careful when setting those wager values, and play the game with golfers of similar skills or use handicaps.

Acey Ducey Example With Dollar Amounts

In our example, we'll set the ace bet value at $2 and the deuce bet value at $1. Our golfers are Players A, B, C and D.

On the first hole, Player A scores 4, B makes 5, C makes 5, D makes 6. That makes Player A the "ace" on this hole, so he wins $2 each from Players B, C and D.

And Player D is the "deuce," with the worst score, so he owes $1 each to A, B and C.

In this example, using $2 and $1 betting levels, we already see how quickly the money adds up. On Hole 1, Player won a total of $7 ($2 from each B, C and D, plus another $1 from D for being the "deuce"), B and C have net losses of $1 (they each pay $2 to A but get $1 from D), and D pays out $5 ($1 to each for being the deuce, plus the $2 owed to A for his "ace" score).

Again, be careful in setting those bet values.

What happens in the event there's a tie for the ace and/or the deuce? Most groups just don't pay out the bet on that hole. But, if your group prefers, you can carry over the pot from that hole to the next. Just make sure this is decided before the round begins.

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